Use of the "More" Tag

Use of the "More" Tag

When you visit your favorite blogs, you may have noticed that some of them have the entire blog post available for you to read on the front page, while others only allow you to see a short snippet of the post and require you to click in to view the whole thing.  The ones with the snippet are taking advantage of the “More” tag, that allows them to decide how much of a post gets shown on the front.

The “More” tag can be very useful, especially if you have a lot of lengthy posts.  Imagine if you had a dozen 500-word posts, all showing up in their full glory on your front page.  Readers would quickly become bogged down and disinterested, because it takes too much work to get to the nexst article.  Using the “More” tag will allow them to briefly browse through each topic, deciding quickly and easily if they want to read that post or scroll to another.

If your posts are already quite short, the “More” tag will be overkill, but you can still take advantage of another feature of using that tag – intrigue.  When you only allow your readers to see a defined part of the blog post, you can create intrigue by using teaser writing in the beginning, making them curious about what you have to say next.  This works well when you want to deliver specific ads related to content that only shows up on individual posts.

Overall, using the “More” tag on longer posts is a good idea.  You keep your front page clean and make it easier for readers to find the content they’re interested in.